Siskiyou Land Conservancy

Protecting California’s Wild North Coast and Rivers Since 2004

Easter Lily Pesticides in the News

Just before Easter 2016, the national on-line news magazine TakePart ran a major story about pesticides used on the Smith River Plain to grow Easter lilies. TakePart describes itself as “the digital division of Participant Media,” the company that brought us such films as Academy Award winning Spotlight, as well as An Inconvenient Truth and CITIZENFOUR. Read the story here.

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Why Siskiyou Land Conservancy?

Siskiyou Land Conservancy founded in 2004 to fill a niche not satisfied in Northwestern California. Our founding board wanted to create a land trust that would take title to, and hold conservation easements on, private properties not served by other land trusts — usually meaning small parcels that hold, and connect, important riparian and terrestrial habitats. In this work we have been successful. Siskiyou Land Conservancy also is the only organization dedicated to eliminating excessive pesticide use on bottomlands that surround the vital Smith River estuary, in Del Norte County. For more on the Smith River estuary click here.

California Pesticide Agency’s Phony Award to Easter Lily Farmers

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In March 2015, in one of the most Orwellian displays of deference to industry ever shown by a California state agency, the California Department of Pesticide Regulation (DPR) gave Easter lily farmers an “Integrated Pest Management (IPM) Innovator Award” for allegedly reducing pesticide use “by about 50 percent over the last 20 years.” Read More

“Acute (and) Chronic Reproductive Toxicity”
Discovered at Smith River Estuary

The town of Smith River (pop. 2,000) is surrounded by lily fields.

State and federal regulators charged with protecting public trust values — such as clean air and water, healthy wildlife, and human health — are apparently uninterested in enforcing laws that should protect the estuary. It was in spring of 2014 that Siskiyou Land Conservancy obtained the clearest evidence that pesticides are indeed poisoning one of Read More

NEWS

Easter Lily Pesticides in the News

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Just before Easter, the national on-line news magazine TakePart has run a major story about pesticides used on the Smith River Plain to grow Easter lilies. TakePart describes itself as "the digital division of Participant Media," the company that brought us such films as Academy Award winning Spotlight, as well as An Inconvenient Truth and CITIZENFOUR.

SLC, Easter lilies and pesticides on Jefferson Exchange radio Friday, March 25

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Siskiyou Land Conservancy Executive Director Greg King will be a guest on the popular radio show the Jefferson Exchange on Friday, March 25th at 8:30 a.m. to discuss pesticide use on the Smith River Plain. Jefferson Public Radio airs on 11 stations, from Central Oregon to the Mendocino Coast, so to find the station nearest Read More

New Report Shows Pesticide Combinations Greatly Increase Cancer

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The Sustainable Technology & Policy Program at UCLA recently released a report that shows a combination of three commonly used, carcinogenic fumigants — two of which, metam sodium and 1,3-dichloropropene, are used in high concentrations on the Smith River Plain — "can interact to synergistically (to) increase the toxicity to humans." What that means is that the whole carcinogenicity is greater than the sum of the carcinogenic parts.Read More

Mad River Easement

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This Siskiyou Land Conservancy "work in progress" is one of our most exciting projects yet. Late in 2015 SLC began development of a conservation easement to protect the natural values of a 183-acre parcel on the Mad River, above Maple Creek. Read More

Smith River Pesticide Presentation Now Available on YouTube

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Our presentation on pesticide use at the Smith River estuary is now up on YouTube.Read More

The four circles represent locations where the California North Coast Regional Water Quality Control Board, in 2010 and 2013, found “acute (and) chronic reproductive toxicity

The four circles represent where the state Water Board found toxicity in streams feeding the Smith River estuary. The glowing circle is at the mouth of Rowdy Creek, where state scientists discovered “acute reproductive toxicity.”

The four circles represent locations where the California North Coast Regional Water Quality Control Board, in 2010 and 2013, found “acute (and) chronic reproductive toxicity” in streams feeding the Smith River estuary. The glowing circle is at the mouth of Rowdy Creek, one of the Smith River’s two most important salmon streams, where the state discovered the “acute” toxicity, meaning that invertebrates that make up the basis of the salmonid food chain not only cannot reproduce, but cannot survive in this water.